Deleting technology can feel good

A challenge we see with many publishers is pressure from staff and line managers to add new apps, services and other technologies, either into their digital publishing channels or as part of the workflow. Sometimes this is helpful, but often times, it’s not.
In fact, deleting technologies in the organisation can be as beneficial as adding them. Often times, a new app or service is added into the workflow mix intended to replace an older or different one. Problem is, the old one is often kept kicking around. This can present some serious challenges, in hard money terms and soft costs.
There will always be those who preferred the old technologies. They were comfortable with them and felt their productivity was good. New tools mean new learning curves and in a newsroom or other publication, that can mean disruption and frustration. In larger newsrooms and publishers, technology is also rarely kept track of. Often because whoever looks after IT isn’t aware that editorial or production have started using a new cloud service as IT wasn’t needed to get it set up.
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If you’re considering a digital transformation for your newsroom or the company as a whole, first look at what you can get rid of in technology terms. Just be sure you’re tossing the right tech though. IT is all about workflow and productivity so you want to involve the people that use the tools everyday. Whoever leads your IT and digital aspects of the company needs to put on their people hat first and foremost.
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Getting rid of technology can of course, reduce costs, sometimes quite significantly, but it can also reduce stress and hep your employees be and feel more productive. IT folks are always happy with less technology to cause them headaches too! Done right, it can feel really good!

About the Author Giles W. Crouch

Giles Crouch is a design anthropologist and CDO/CIO. He spent over 20 years in globally-focussed marketing communications for technology products and services, but his roots are anthropology in a modern sense. He uniquely ties his deep knowledge of technology, marketing, design thinking and design anthropology as a polymath to help clients seeking digital advantage in today’s complex world. Giles has been regularly interviewed by international news media on topics such as social media, blockchain, artificial intelligence and it’s impacts on society. He is a passionate practitioner of design thinking and anthropology. Giles is prolific writer and public speaker, lecturer and keynote. He has also completed over 250 netnographic research projects since 2009. His secondary activity is as Group Publisher with Human Media Inc.

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